Posts Tagged ‘government’

Learning the Value of Australian Aid in Cambodia

February 2nd, 2016 by CBM Australia

This blog is written by CBM Australia Senior Advisor of Program Development, David Brown, who accompanied a delegation of Australian politicians on a learning tour to Cambodia from 17 to 22 January 2016. The delegates visited a range of development and humanitarian agencies to see firsthand the type of projects supported by the Australian government’s aid program.

Phnom Penh is a city of two million people. It is the centre of Cambodia’s growth projects – its housing and construction boom, and the face of Chinese investment in new townships and large casinos. The normal daily scene would leave an Occupational Health and Safety officer in Australia pale – two men ride by on a motorbike, the passenger carrying a three metre ladder, at high speed a helmetless adolescent weaves in and out of SUVs, tuk-tuks, bikes and pedestrians – watched by a group of three men in wheelchairs who lost limbs to landmines placed during the terrible internal conflict of more than thirty disability, years ago.

A delegation of Australian politicians visit Cambodia to learn the value of Australian Aid in the country.

A delegation of Australian politicians visit Cambodia to learn the value of Australian Aid in the country.

Cambodia has reportedly the largest percentage of population with a disability in South East Asia – and the rapid growth in access to motorised transport without safe infrastructure means that road traffic accidents now account for more than 10 times the physical impairments still occurring through unexploded landmines.

I’m here with a delegation of six lower and upper Australian parliamentary house members. They are visiting as part of a Gates Foundation grant to enable Save the Children to set up a series of visits with development and humanitarian agencies supported by the Australian Government’s aid program, of which CBM Australia is one.

Since 2010, CBM Australia has partnered with the Cambodian Development Mission for Disability (CDMD), with funding support from the Australian Aid Program. CBM Australia supports CDMD to provide a comprehensive and empowering approach to disability inclusion in Cambodia across five provinces, and supports more than 140 Self-help groups of people with disability and their families.

Participation in CDMD Self-help groups leads to positive psychological and economic changes, as well as increased household incomes for people with disability. And this is what the delegation is coming to see.

The plastic chairs have been covered with brightly coloured material – a normal custom for weddings and other important events in Cambodia. Even some old electric fans are wheeled in to keep the politicians comfortable – and the normal offerings of drink and fruit are generous. Everything is set as the Australian politicians arrive at a commune outside of Phnom Penh.

The visit aims to set the context in which Cambodian people with disability live and the ongoing challenges related to income, access, participation and rights. Also, it aims to give a glimpse of the kind of ongoing community work led by CDMD and its committed staff and volunteers.

The Self-help Group of 12 women and men are part of CBM-partner CDMD’s network of empowering people with disability to problem solve and support each other in finding solutions to the challenges they face in their lives. Also present is the Vice-President of the Commune – a local politician – and the Australian politicians congratulate him for his response to meeting some of the needs of people with disability.

After we give a contextual overview of challenges facing the broader population of people with disability in Cambodia, the delegation hear the personal stories of three group members who had benefited through increased commune support and loans to assist in livelihood activities: small businesses and chicken farms amongst others.

A CDMD volunteer advocate, Chenda, gives a very moving account of her own commitment to changing attitudes, looking for greater educational opportunities, and the promotion of rights for all people with disability.

Chenda was born blind, as was her younger brother, and through the encouragement of her family and support from organisations such as CDMD and Handicap International, she was studying psychology at the Royal Phnom Penh University.  Through working as a disability rights advocate, she has learnt much about engaging with authorities, and her speech is a great indication of her skill.  She is extremely diplomatic but also able to communicate clearly the challenges of access to education and to fulfilment of rights.

“You gave a really inspiring talk. Thanks so much”.  A group of women politicians gathered around Chenda to congratulate her on her part in the meeting.

I was very impressed with this delegation – the politicians sat patiently during the translations and listened respectfully.  They asked intelligent questions and seemed to genuinely try to fit this scene from semi-rural Cambodia and the Self-help group’s stories into a way of thinking about the Australian Aid program.  The constant movement of chickens and the local itinerant salesmen’s tuk-tuk loudspeakers provided a dose of reality that seemed to be appreciated by all. And their words of thanks and appreciation – particularly to Chenda and to the commune’s vice-president – were very sincere and heartfelt.

In 2015, CDMD with the support of CBM Australia and funding support from the Australian Aid Program, changed lives by:

  • 12,271 people with disability referred to health services
  • 339 children with disability enrolled in school
  • 542 people with disability improved their income through livelihood schemes, vocational training and participation in Self-help groups
  • 51 non government organisations and commune councils integrating disability inclusion into development plans
  • 274 awareness-raising events

 

Politicians who attended as part of the delegation included:

Mr Dan Tehan MP

Ms Gai Brodtmann MP

Senator Linda Reynolds CSC

The Hon Darren Chester MP

Ms Lisa Chesters MP

Ms Sharon Claydon MP

Thank you to Save the Children and the Gates Foundation for making this visit possible.

A Voice for Justice

October 13th, 2015 by CBM Australia

Elle Spring, an advocacy support officer at CBM Australia, writes this blog from the Voices for Justice Conference in Canberra.

The annual four-day Voices for Justice Conference in Canberra has kicked off and day two is already coming to a close. The conference offers participants a unique opportunity to gather with like-minded Christians from across Australia and raise a united voice to influence our nation’s political leaders and government policy for the benefit of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people. The practical conference aims to equip and inspire new and experienced advocates alike.

I’m here with Stevie Wills, a community education officer also from CBM Australia. Stevie is an incredibly talented performance poet, public speaker and advocate. Myself and other attendees at Voices for Justice have been fortunate enough to hear Stevie’s latest poem about Foreign Aid performed for the first time! It’s a strong message to remind us that foreign aid is not about charity, it’s about development, and Australia can do more in promoting a just and equal world for all.

I’m thrilled to share Stevie’s poem here and I strongly encourage you to take a few moments of your time to read and absorb the beautifully crafted words.

Foreign Aid

Discrepancy
between the notion of generosity
and the allocation of equity
to the foreign aid budget
if doubled
even tripled
it would remain less than one percent
of gross national income.
Promises alongside the United Nations
delayed
diverted
from our fair share
to give a fair go.
A fair go
is a hand up
over a hand out
empowerment
over charity
it’s immunisation
minimisation of death by preventable causes
separation of sewage
from drinking, washing water
sanitation and skilled attendants
at the births of sons and daughters
education, souls expanding their borders
of capabilities
opportunities
possibilities.

Australia, we could give our fair share
allocate still more yet
leave the lions share
around ninety-nine percent
to look after our own.
Does that not negate
the need to designate
who’s first looked after?
Enabled to look after
our own and others
simultaneously.

So let us speak up for fair
speak out for right.
Let compassion prevail over fear
hope transcend despair
generosity triumph over insecurity
love conquer apathy.
Let us look not only to our own interests
but also to the interests of others.
Let us speak justice into being
speaking voices of justice.

By Stevie Wills